Computerese

Modern technology:
the good, the bad, the funny.


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infoneer-pulse:

A Texas University’s Mind-Boggling Database Of Teens’ Daily Text Messages, Emails, and IMs Over Four Years

Underwood somehow got the project approved by the IRB, received a $3.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), hooked up with Ceryx and Global Relay — companies that help financial companies capture employee communication per SEC rules — and got over 175 of her 281 participants to sign up for the Digital Panopticon. (Some students dropped out because they preferred iPhones to Blackberries, says Underwood.) The kids and their parents have to sign “detailed consent forms” yearly. There are 81 girls and 94 boys; 23% of them are African-American, 50% are Caucasian, and 15% are Hispanic. Nearly half come from families that make less that $75K per year. Other than paying participants $50 for lab visits, the only financial compensation is the phone and its associated plan, which comes out to a little over $600 per person.
The kids are now high school seniors; the capture of their digital communications over the past four years provides an intimate look at their private lives. There have been countless studies about how kids use technology, but this detailed collection is the first of its kind.
Previous studies have involved looking at teens’ social networking pages, blogs, and chat rooms — all publicly available. “No previous published research has provided adolescents with cell phones or smart phones and recorded the content of their electronic communication,” write the researchers in a recent paper. “The only previous study that measured the content of text messaging required college students to write down all text messages for a 24-hr period in a diary.”
Not as good, obviously.

» via Forbes

infoneer-pulse:

A Texas University’s Mind-Boggling Database Of Teens’ Daily Text Messages, Emails, and IMs Over Four Years

Underwood somehow got the project approved by the IRB, received a $3.4 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), hooked up with Ceryx and Global Relay — companies that help financial companies capture employee communication per SEC rules — and got over 175 of her 281 participants to sign up for the Digital Panopticon. (Some students dropped out because they preferred iPhones to Blackberries, says Underwood.) The kids and their parents have to sign “detailed consent forms” yearly. There are 81 girls and 94 boys; 23% of them are African-American, 50% are Caucasian, and 15% are Hispanic. Nearly half come from families that make less that $75K per year. Other than paying participants $50 for lab visits, the only financial compensation is the phone and its associated plan, which comes out to a little over $600 per person.

The kids are now high school seniors; the capture of their digital communications over the past four years provides an intimate look at their private lives. There have been countless studies about how kids use technology, but this detailed collection is the first of its kind.

Previous studies have involved looking at teens’ social networking pages, blogs, and chat rooms — all publicly available. “No previous published research has provided adolescents with cell phones or smart phones and recorded the content of their electronic communication,” write the researchers in a recent paper. “The only previous study that measured the content of text messaging required college students to write down all text messages for a 24-hr period in a diary.”

Not as good, obviously.

» via Forbes

nevver:

Kittens Texting

Okay, sure. Why not?

nevver:

Kittens Texting

Okay, sure. Why not?

thedailywhat:

From the Archives: Way back in 1982, when Atari was just past its prime, a man named Bob Stein, who worked at Encyclopedia Britannica as well as Atari, worked with Alan Kay and Disney animator Glenn Keane on a series of illustrations showing off Stein’s idea for an “Intelligent Encyclopedia” that could tell its user about earthquakes, stocks, and history.
Their drawings look eerily similar to the first laptops, and the bones of the encyclopedia eventually manifested as Wikipedia two decades later. “The most interesting thing for me today about these images is that although we foresaw that people would be accessing information wirelessly (notice the little antenna on the device in the tide pool image,” Stein said, “we completely missed the most important aspect of the network — that it was going to connect people to other people.”
[shortformblog]

thedailywhat:

From the Archives: Way back in 1982, when Atari was just past its prime, a man named Bob Stein, who worked at Encyclopedia Britannica as well as Atari, worked with Alan Kay and Disney animator Glenn Keane on a series of illustrations showing off Stein’s idea for an “Intelligent Encyclopedia” that could tell its user about earthquakes, stocks, and history.

Their drawings look eerily similar to the first laptops, and the bones of the encyclopedia eventually manifested as Wikipedia two decades later. “The most interesting thing for me today about these images is that although we foresaw that people would be accessing information wirelessly (notice the little antenna on the device in the tide pool image,” Stein said, “we completely missed the most important aspect of the network — that it was going to connect people to other people.”

[shortformblog]

(Source: thedailywhat)

seltzerlizard:

When my browser (Firefox 11) can’t load a page, I see this on the far right of my screen.  I was curious about the origin of the graphic, so I Googled it.
Apparently, nobody in the entire world has ever mentioned it on the internet.
Does anyone know what this is?

It’s the Lizard of Doom.

seltzerlizard:

When my browser (Firefox 11) can’t load a page, I see this on the far right of my screen.  I was curious about the origin of the graphic, so I Googled it.

Apparently, nobody in the entire world has ever mentioned it on the internet.

Does anyone know what this is?

It’s the Lizard of Doom.

thedailyfeed:

Welcome to the Silicon Beach — a stretch of 10 blocks along the Pacific Ocean and home to one of the highest concentrations of tech companies and startups anywhere outside Silicon Valley or Alley.

“There’s a Wild West boomtown thing going on here right now,” said Michael Dubin, 33, who launched Dollar Shave Club last month with a YouTube video that’s been viewed more than 4 million times. “L.A. is a place where you can think big. I couldn’t imagine any place I’d rather be.”From this pressure cooker of ideas and venture capital, a new kind of Hollywood star is emerging — the 21st-century tech star. Known more for digital innovation than acting talent, these entrepreneurs are poised to become the darlings of Tinseltown.

Photo by Joe Kohen for The Daily

thedailyfeed:

Welcome to the Silicon Beach — a stretch of 10 blocks along the Pacific Ocean and home to one of the highest concentrations of tech companies and startups anywhere outside Silicon Valley or Alley.

“There’s a Wild West boomtown thing going on here right now,” said Michael Dubin, 33, who launched Dollar Shave Club last month with a YouTube video that’s been viewed more than 4 million times. “L.A. is a place where you can think big. I couldn’t imagine any place I’d rather be.”

From this pressure cooker of ideas and venture capital, a new kind of Hollywood star is emerging — the 21st-century tech star. Known more for digital innovation than acting talent, these entrepreneurs are poised to become the darlings of Tinseltown.

Photo by Joe Kohen for The Daily

(via thedailyfeed)

Just as early modern roads were first maintained and run privately, so today are our early digital roads privately owned, and we are negotiating whether that is best for society. (At the start of the 19th century, Allen says, commerce and civic services “demanded that the roads ‘accomodate the traffic, rather than the traffic accomodate the roads.’” That is our battle today, eh?) The (continuing) institutional revolution | BuzzMachine (via interestingsnippets)

(via infoneer-pulse)