Computerese

Modern technology:
the good, the bad, the funny.


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Twitter:@reference_lib
jchiappa:

Facinating article…  The big take-away here is that our younger generation seems more geared toward an app-centric, pay based content model as opposed to searching for other (free) options on the web.  Younger web users are also not reading critically, like their adult counter parts.  One can speculate that despite the amount of free course-ware becoming available, there will be a huge industry for people who will be able to organize and strip down information and then repackage it into app form for future students…
infoneer-pulse:

Usability Study Shows Kids Don’t Search

While adult Internet users are increasingly “search dominant,” kids navigate the web using bookmarks, remembering their favorite sites, and accessing paid subscription content and games. That’s one of the findings from a new qualitative usability study on how children use the web by human-computer interaction researcher Jakob Nielsen of the Nielsen Norman Group. His report makes it seem as if kids have more of an app mentality than a search mentality when compared to adults.
Nielsen had completed a similar study in 2001, so his results are particularly interesting in the context of what children were doing nine years ago. Back then, he contended that kids were not as proficient as using the web as was widely assumed. Now, he argues that kids as young as six are highly proficient, and kids as young as nine are as proficient as adults. (Three-to-six-year-olds, which Nielsen and collaborator Raluca Budiu studied for the first time this year, are increasingly web-savvy but hindered by their inability to read.) And many kids are adopting the habits of long-time Internet users — for instance, skimming pages and skipping instructions just like adults, rather than reading them carefully as they did nine years ago.

» via GigaOM

jchiappa:

Facinating article…  The big take-away here is that our younger generation seems more geared toward an app-centric, pay based content model as opposed to searching for other (free) options on the web.  Younger web users are also not reading critically, like their adult counter parts.  One can speculate that despite the amount of free course-ware becoming available, there will be a huge industry for people who will be able to organize and strip down information and then repackage it into app form for future students…

infoneer-pulse:

Usability Study Shows Kids Don’t Search

While adult Internet users are increasingly “search dominant,” kids navigate the web using bookmarks, remembering their favorite sites, and accessing paid subscription content and games. That’s one of the findings from a new qualitative usability study on how children use the web by human-computer interaction researcher Jakob Nielsen of the Nielsen Norman Group. His report makes it seem as if kids have more of an app mentality than a search mentality when compared to adults.

Nielsen had completed a similar study in 2001, so his results are particularly interesting in the context of what children were doing nine years ago. Back then, he contended that kids were not as proficient as using the web as was widely assumed. Now, he argues that kids as young as six are highly proficient, and kids as young as nine are as proficient as adults. (Three-to-six-year-olds, which Nielsen and collaborator Raluca Budiu studied for the first time this year, are increasingly web-savvy but hindered by their inability to read.) And many kids are adopting the habits of long-time Internet users — for instance, skimming pages and skipping instructions just like adults, rather than reading them carefully as they did nine years ago.

» via GigaOM

(Source: buzzfeed)

alrightinnit:

Yelp is your embarrassing dad.

alrightinnit:

Yelp is your embarrassing dad.

(Source: fartinscorsexy)

theweekmagazine:

Could Facebook actually improve Instagram? That’s Chris Taylor at Mashable’s theory. Consider Google’s acquisition of YouTube for $1.65 billion in 2006. The search giant left the video service to do its own thing, “only this time with access to piles of Google cash.” If Facebook does likewise, as Zuckerberg is promising, the Instagram you already love will only get better.

theweekmagazine:

Could Facebook actually improve Instagram? That’s Chris Taylor at Mashable’s theory. Consider Google’s acquisition of YouTube for $1.65 billion in 2006. The search giant left the video service to do its own thing, “only this time with access to piles of Google cash.” If Facebook does likewise, as Zuckerberg is promising, the Instagram you already love will only get better.

jessbennett:

In case you were wondering how Michael Stipe really feels about Facebook + Instagram. 

jessbennett:

In case you were wondering how Michael Stipe really feels about Facebook + Instagram. 

Just as Instagram makes bad photos look good and good photos look great, Facebook makes you look happy and loved if you’re not, and joyous and adored if you are. Self-brand and share. Filter, and share. Share the edited stuff, the varnished stuff, the stuff with the halo around it. Take a step away from truth for the sake of beauty. Dan Zak, in a day-after essay on how Facebook and Instagram were meant for each other. (via washingtonpoststyle)

(Source: trashcanland)

Game-studies scholars (there are such things) like to point out that games tend to reflect the societies in which they are created and played. Monopoly, for instance, makes perfect sense as a product of the 1930s — it allowed anyone, in the middle of the Depression, to play at being a tycoon. Risk, released in the 1950s, is a stunningly literal expression of cold-war realpolitik. Twister is the translation, onto a game board, of the mid-1960s sexual revolution. One critic called it “sex in a box.” Tetris was invented exactly when and where you would expect — in a Soviet computer lab in 1984 — and its game play reflects this origin. The enemy in Tetris is not some identifiable villain (Donkey Kong, Mike Tyson, Carmen Sandiego) but a faceless, ceaseless, reasonless force that threatens constantly to overwhelm you, a churning production of blocks against which your only defense is a repetitive, meaningless sorting. Sam Anderson (via thebronzemedal)

(Source: 80s-touch, via mudwerks)

boston:

EXCLUSIVE THURSDAY PREVIEW | TECH LAB
Nokia Lumia 900: The ultimate Windows phone? 
- The sleek, high-performance Lumia is a worthy rival to the more costly iPhone from Apple and the horde of high-end phones running Google’s Android software.

boston:

EXCLUSIVE THURSDAY PREVIEW | TECH LAB

Nokia Lumia 900: The ultimate Windows phone?

- The sleek, high-performance Lumia is a worthy rival to the more costly iPhone from Apple and the horde of high-end phones running Google’s Android software.

newsweek:

A tale of two search companies. (h/t Julie Stone)

newsweek:

A tale of two search companies. (h/t Julie Stone)

(via theweekmagazine)